Show Me the Content Strategy!

Julie Vollenweider

Hi, Brain Traffic. Before we continue, can you send me an example content strategy?

It’s quite common for me to hear this question during preliminary conversations for project work. Despite being a regular request, it’s not an easy one to answer, for three main reasons:

  • Differences in vocabulary (how you define certain terms)
  • Specifics unique to your needs and project
  • Key drivers for why you want to see a sample

With content strategy, there's no "one-size-fits-all" approach.

Although this is a complex question to address, it’s not impossible. Here’s how it breaks down …

Vocabulary

As an emerging discipline, “content strategy” can mean different things to different people. At Brain Traffic, our view of content strategy includes four main components—substance, structure, workflow, and governance. We call it the quad.

However, not everyone thinks about content strategy in these terms. For example, to some, content strategy means editorial components like aneditorial calendar or a content style guide. To others, content strategy means cataloguing and organizing content. And the list goes on …

That’s why before sharing samples, it’s important to align expectations for content strategy, including:

  • What comprises your definition?
  • What’s your ideal approach? (If you don’t know, here’s our suggested methodology.)
  • What are your desired deliverables and outcomes?

Specifics

In addition to differences in content strategy vocabulary, your content needs, opportunities, circumstances, and resources are unique—every content strategy project is different.

Because we embrace each project’s unique attributes, our work at Brain Traffic is highly customized. That’s why our work doesn’t yield a “standard” content strategy deliverable that can easily translate as a sample. What we created for Client X isn’t necessarily going to be a meaningful illustration of how we can help you with your content.

So, the next step in our conversation is to talk about your unique situation, including:

  • A brief description of your proposed content strategy project
  • What you hope content strategy will achieve for your organization
  • Timing and budget requirements

Drivers

Finally, it’s important to get a sense for why you are asking to see an example content strategy. Do you need to:

  • Prove to your organization that you need content strategy?
  • Vet our experience solving issues or uncovering opportunities similar to yours?
  • See the level of detail we’ll include in our deliverable(s)?

The driver for your request may be more effectively demonstrated with a customized presentation of Brain Traffic’s capabilities and methodology, relevant case studies of our previous work, a conversation with one of our current clients, annotated excerpts from a related deliverable, a combination of all the previous items, or something else entirely.

The moral of the story is that we’d love to help you out! In order to do that most successfully, we’ll need to have an exploratory conversation to confirm your request, get a sense for your potential project, and understand how we can get you the most important information.