Should You Complement Your Intranet With Knowledge From Employees?

Meghan Casey

Employee intranets have traditionally been owned and managed by technology, communications, or human resources. Today, there’s a trend toward employee intranets being owned by teams responsible for internal knowledge sharing or knowledge management.

That makes a lot of sense, but it also can cause confusion. Words like “knowledge,” “knowledge sharing,” and “content” mean different things to different people. Often, the problem is that people are trying to draw a line between knowledge and content.

That conversation goes everywhere, and then, ultimately, nowhere. Why? Because content and knowledge are not comparable terms. It’s like trying to compare an apple to helium. So, where do we begin?

First, let’s define some things

All too often, we assume people know what we mean when we use certain terms. And that can get us into trouble. So, let me define what I mean when I use the terms knowledge, knowledge sharing, and content.

Knowledge is the state of knowing something. As in:

Knowledge sharing refers to the act of sharing something you know with others. It happens many ways—hallway conversations, on-the-job training, seminars, etc. Sometimes it’s enabled by technology, like this:

Content is the documentation of knowledge. It is one way in which knowledge can be tangibly shared or transferred. For example:

Enough about The Outsiders. Let’s talk intranets.

The goal of most employee intranets is to transfer knowledge from the business to its employees. That happens with business-to-employee content. Sorta like this:

More and more, companies are realizing the importance of enabling employees to share knowledge with each other. That employee-to-employee content can add credibility to business-to-employee content by adding context. It can also provide business benefits, like:

  • Saving human and financial resources, because employees and teams aren’t constantly “reinventing the wheel”
  • Encouraging conversations that lead to new ways of thinking and ideas that influence profitability
  • Supporting employees’ ability to collaborate with each other and draw on each other’s missteps and successes

Intranet content folks typically are responsible for the business-to-employee content on the intranet. That’s why they are the perfect people to take on the strategic integration of existing business-to-employee content with the employee-to-employee content that may exist, or could be identified and curated, throughout the company.

OK, one last example building on the scenario above:

You don’t have to own it all or do it all at once

The task of integrating business-to-employee content with employee-to-employee content might seem pretty daunting, like most every content project. But, also like most every content project, getting people to collaborate and breaking the work into manageable pieces can help.

Ready to get started?

Here are a few possible first steps:

  • Determine which topics covered on your intranet could be bolstered with a perspective from employees
  • Work with your colleagues around the organization to find out who has knowledge and experience related to those topics
  • Pick a couple topics to start with and interview the employees you identified to find out how their knowledge might translate to content
  • Put some ideas together in the form of outlines or sketches and shop them around